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tv   [untitled]    June 26, 2012 1:30pm-2:00pm PDT

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there are at least 18 farmers markets in san francisco alone, providing fresh and affordable to year-round. this is a great resource that does not break the bank. to show just how easy it can be to do just that, we have come up with something called the farmers' market challenge. we find someone who loves to cook, give them $20, and challenge them to create a delicious meal from ingredients found right here in the farmer's market. who did we find for today's challenge? >> today with regard to made a
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pot greater thanchapino. >> you only have $20 to spend. >> i know peter it is going to be tough, but i think i can do it. it is a san francisco classic. we are celebrating bay area food. we have nice beautiful plum tomatoes here. we have some beautiful fresh fish here. it will come together beautifully. >> many to cut out all this talk, and let's go shop. yeah. ♪ >> what makes your dish unique? >> i like it spicy and smoky. i will take fresh italian tomatoes and the fresh seafood, and will bring them to other with some nice spoked paprika and some nice smoked jalapeno peppers. i am going to stew them up and
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get a nice savory, smoky, fishy, tomatoy, spicy broth. >> bring it on. how are you feeling? >> i feel good. i spent the $20 and have a few pennies less. i am going to go home and cook. i will text message u.n. is done. >> excellent and really looking forward to it. >> today we're going to make the san francisco classic dish invented by italian and portuguese fishermen. it'll be like a nice spaghetti sauce. then we will put in the fish soup. the last thing is the dungeon as crab, let it all blend together. it will be delicious. when i could, i will try to make healthy meals with fresh ingredients, whatever is in season and local. those juicy, fresh tomatoes will take about an hour to cook down into a nice sauce. this is a good time to make our fish stock. we will take a step that seems
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like trash and boil it up in water and make a delicious and they speed up my parents were great clerics, and we had wonderful food. family dinners are very important. any chance you can sit down together and have a meal together, it is great communal atmosphere. one of the things i like the most is the opportunity to be creative. hello. anybody with sets their mind to it can cut. always nice to start chopping some vegetables and x and the delicious. all this double in view is this broth with great flavor. but your heart into it. make something that you, family, and friends will really enjoy. >> i am here with a manager at the heart of the city farmer's market in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80.
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>> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank you for speaking with us. are you on the web? >> yes, hocfarmersmarket.org. >> check them out. thank you. >> welcome. the dish is ready. >> it looks and smells amazing. >> thank you. it was not easy to meet the $20 budget. i checked everybody out and found some great produce. really lovely seafood. i think that you are going to love it. >> do not be shy. cyou know this can run you
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$35 to $45 for a bowl, so it is great you did this for $20. >> this will feed four to six people. >> not if you invite me over for dinner. i am ready to dig in. >> i hope you'll love it. >> mmm. >> what do you think? >> i think i am going to need more. perhaps you can have all you want. >> i am produce the that you have crushed this farmer's market challenge by a landslide. the first, we're going to have to tally of your shopping list and see what you actually spend that the farmer's market. >> and go for it. >> incredible. you have shown us how to make super healthy, refresh chapino from the farmers market on the budget, that for the whole family. that is outstanding.
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>> thank you peter i am glad that you like it. i think anybody can do it. >> if you like the recipe for this dish, you can e-mail us at sfgtv@sfgov.org or reach out to us on facebook or twitter and we
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>> thank you. good morning, everyone. thank you very much. as many of you know, i'm a person that doesn't like a whole lot of drama. but i do want to make sure that we take this opportunity to enjoy. this budget is one that's important to all of us, it certainly is one to me and one that reflects a lot of great work. first of all, let me thank everybody for coming this morning. certainly board president david chiu for helping me co-host this and carmen chu and her work with us already started and will help guide us, along with board president david chiu on all of the hearings that the rest of the board will have. i want to thank each and every
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member of the board of supervisors as well. you've been weighing in and we've been creating a different dialogue on the front end to make sure that all of our constituents know what we're doing, more transparent, and ultimately where our values are. i also want a big shout-out and thanks to everybody in this room. there's a lot of department heads and commissions and labor representatives and representatives from our non-profits and community members as well. thank you for engaging us in this really dedicated six-month process. i want to go back to the very first neighborhood budget hearing that we held about almost six months ago. it was one where i was asked at the very beginning, what does the budget mean to you? and i wasn't the only one. there were several supervisors that were there, and we all said pretty much the same thing. it really is a reflection of our values as a city and it's
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one that we want to work hard at, but ultimately it is who we are and it's a combined effort here, a collaborative effort. so it still is that way, and you'll see from the highlights that we'll be announcing today, as reflected in this budget, it still is a reflection of all of our values. so good morning, everybody. thank you for joining me here today. again, thank you for board president chiu and budget chair carmen chu and all the others that i've identified here today. i also want to say at the outset this budget reflects countless hours of work. a lot of work behind the scenes. in addition to all the neighborhood budget meetings that we had, there were numerous, numerous staff meetings. kate howard's done a wonderful job with her staff. they've met with all of the different departments -- [applause]
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this is her first full year budget working with us and she's done a great job and her staff has done a great job. it isn't just putting numbers together, it's listening to each of the finance personnel from each department, it is engaging in the numerous meetings that we have with community, it's engaging with staff of the various supervisors, the non-profits. we had special meetings help, it was health and human services and housing and homeless advocates and others. she was there and her staff was there at every turn making sure that we listened and it reflected in both number-crunching and challenging what the priorities are and so forth. also want to give a shout-out to steve cava.
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steve, wonderful with all your work. [applause] it's not easy. you and micki callahan, it's really not easy at all to face a year when there's 27 contracts open, trying to face everybody in the room, trying to make sure that we can make promises we can keep. having been a former employees relations director, i know that keeping promises with our labor representative is critical to building trust and to make sure that we carry out and we honor all that they do every single day in carrying out services for us. to all the department heads and your wonderful staffs, thank you. i also want to make sure i acknowledge all of our labor unions, all of our representatives. for years you've worked with us and sacrificed and bemoaned the
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bad budget years, but you've stepped up in every occasion. for the department heads and non-department heads who we've shared challenges with, thank you for sacrificing so many years. and now we get to, i think, a budget that has some relatively good news and a good foundation. this year we begin the hard work of presenting the city's first two-year budget. and we began that year with a $263 million deficit for our general fund. and then the coming year, the second year of $375 million shortfall. that's what we faced at the very beginning. but because of the fiscal discipline that we put in process, a discipline that's reflected in the great work of ben rose enfield and his staff and the controller's office that keeps reminding me of the credit ratings of our city and that we must make sure that we do things in a very solid
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financial way, we made investments in job creation and we made commitments to reform with that guidance. now san francisco's economy is recovering and reserves are going. in fact, during the last nine months the controller has reported that our revenues were $172 million more than projected. this is good news. this is good news, but it did not come without commitments, without sacrifice by everybody and all the groups represented in this room. i would like to again thank owe employee unions for working with us to find a common goal, saving more than $28 million in your contract negotiations with us. i'm happy to report that i'm presenting a responsible and balanced two-year budget. while we spare the city the deep cuts we've experienced over the last several years and one that i present to you in a
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san francisco economy that's recovering, in this budget you will see investments. investments that ensure that people who live, work and visit our city feel safe, investments that protect our social safety net that supports seniors and youth, low-income and working-class families, investments that support our neighborhoods, our infrastructure and our commercial corridors. this budget reflects a lot of collaboration and partnership with our san francisco community. one thing we agreed on early was that in a time of state and federal cuts, protecting our social safety net is more important than ever, and in this budget i've rejected all service reductions in our health department and human service agencies. [applause] s i've included full restoration of federal cuts to programs and services that serve people with h.i.v. and
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aids. the loss of redevelopment has been a severe blow to our city, especially for this first street corridor. so we will invest in economic initiatives in the heart of bayview to stabilize businesses and attract new ones. [applause] we will also continue our investment in central market and especially sixth street, where the elimination of redevelopment has left a gap in services. with our community partners and including the very spirited arts community that's been so wonderful in helping us lead that effort, we'll support businesses in that sector, attract new ones, and keep the area clean and safe.
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we will also invest in the youth of sfsk and in their education. i will propose releasing the $6 million in rainy day funds to support our public schools, to offset the state's deep cuts to education. [applause] most importantly in this budget we are putting san franciscans back to work. you've heard me say on many occasions recently our unemployment rate dropped from 9.6% in early 2011 to 7.4% today, our lowest since 2008. [applause] we, as a city, along with our business partners and every neighborhood, we created 22,500 net new jobs in san francisco in just the last year. [applause] that's good. that is really good, but we need to do more. with this budget we are
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continuing to invest in strategies and incentivized job creation, training, and place our residents for their jobs for the 21st sent re. we are creating a climate that gives entrepreneurs and investors confidence in our city, allowing them to work with us to innovate, grow and create jobs, whether they are in neighborhoods, small businesses or tech start-up or a thriving global headquarters. in neighborhoods, we are more than doubling grants available to small businesses, and we are including $4 million for neighborhood commercial districts through our new invest in neighborhood strategy. that includes job squad and the recapitalize the small business revolving loan fund. we are bringing staal to the neighborhoods -- city hall to the neighborhoods where it belongs, to support small businesses. my proposed budget includes $4 million in smart capital
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investments and $441 million in smart capital investments in our city's 10-year capital plan to improve and invest in the city's infrastructure. [applause] over the next two years we'll invest in and improve or water system and continue investing in our waterfront. we will also continue to invest in our parks. and i've joined the members of the board of supervisors to introduce $195 million bond measure to keep our parks clean and safe. [applause] all told, over the next two years enterprise departments will spend more than -- will actually support more than 8,700 jobs in san francisco by infusing $1.3 billion into our
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local economy. as our economy grows and as we add jobs, we must redouble our efforts to expand housing opportunities and build more housing for people at every income level. i get it. i know there's anxiety out there, because rents are start together creep up again in every neighborhood as our economy recovers. but the answer to scarce housing and rising rents is not to stop growing our economy or creating jobs. that's why we proposed the housing trust fund measure for this november, to create a permanent source of housing and revenue to fund the production of housing at every level of our economic spectrum. i am pleased to share with you, too, that my budget also includes a six-year police and fire hiring plan. [applause] this hiring plan for police and fire will train the next
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generation of san francisco public safety personnel. we are planning for anticipated retirement, reducing overtime and making sure our public safety departments are appropriately stand. mow, of course, this submission of the bubt is not the end of the process. i've looked forward to working with the full board to ensure that our residents receive quality services while we balance the budget and continue in our economic recovery. i again want to recognize supervisor carmen chu and the board of supervisors for their steadfast leadership and commitment to building a collaborative process, backed up with our board president, david chiu. thank you steve cava, chief of staff, thank you budget office, director kate howard, and to best rosenfeld, thank you to you and your wonderful staff and i will advance, thank you harvey rose, for his work he'll be doing.
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this is very less dramatic presentation, i know that. but all the work that's been done in a very comprehensive way, and i want you to know that the values of the city are intact, we are moving forward, and we are investing in all of our neighbors in san francisco. thank you very much. [applause] ok, back to work.
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when a resident of san francisco is looking for health care, you look in your neighborhood first. what is closest to you? if you come to a neighborhood health center or a clinic, you then have access it a system of care in the community health network. we are a system of care that was probably based on the family practice model, but it was really clear that there are special populations with special needs. the cole street clinic is a youth clinic in the heart of the haight ashbury and they target youth. tom woodell takes care of many of the central city residents and they have great expertise in providing services for many of the homeless.
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potrero hill and southeast health centers are health centers in those particular communities that are family health centers, so they provide health care to patients across the age span. . >> many of our clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over
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the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to age 5 they are able to receive food vouchers to get milk and cereal for their children. >> it's for the city, not only our clinic, but the city. we have all our children in san francisco should have insurance now because if they are low income enough, they get medical. if they actually have a little more assets, a little more income, they can get happy family. we do have family who come outside of our neighborhood to
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come on our clinic. one thing i learn from our clients, no matter how old they are, no matter how little english they know, they know how to get to chinatown, meaning they know how to get to our clinic. 85 percent of our staff is bilingual because we are serving many monolingual chinese patients. they can be child care providers so our clients can go out and work. >> we found more and more women of child bearing age come down with cancer and they have kids and the kids were having a horrible time and parents were having a horrible time. how do parents tell their kids they may not be here? what we do is provide a place and the material and support and then they figure out their own truth, what it means to
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them. i see the behavior change in front of my eyes. maybe they have never been able to go out of boundaries, their lives have been so rigid to sort of expressing that makes tremendous changes. because we did what we did, it is now sort of a nationwide model. >> i think you would be surprised if you come to these clinics. many of them i think would be your neighbors if you knew that. often times we just don't discuss that. we treat husband and wife and they bring in their kids or we treat the grandparents and then the next generation. there are people who come in who need treatment for their heart disease or for their diabetes or their high blood pressure or their cholesterol or their hepatitis b. we actually provide group medical visits and group education classes and meeting people who have similar chronic illnesses as you do really
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helps you understand that you are not alone in dealing with this. and it validates the experiences that you have and so you learn from each other. >> i think it's very important to try to be in tune with the needs of the community and a lot of our patients have -- a lot of our patients are actually immigrants who have a lot of competing priorities, family issues, child care issues, maybe not being able to find work or finding work and not being insured and health care sometimes isn't the top priority for them. we need to understand that so that we can help them take care of themselves physically and emotionally to deal with all these other things. they also have to be working through with people living longer and living with more chronic conditions i think we're going to see more patients coming through. >> starting next year, every day 10,000 people will hit the
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age of 60 until 2020. . >> the needs of the patients that we see at kerr senior center often have to do with the consequences of long standing substance abuse and mental illness, linked to their chronic diseases. heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, stroke, those kinds of chronic illnesses. when you get them in your 30's and 40's and you have them into your aging process, you are not going to have a comfortable old age. you are also seeing in terms of epidemics, an increase in alzheimer's and it is going to increase as the population increases. there are quite a few seniors who have mental health problems but they are also, the majority of seniors, who are hard-working, who had minimum
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wage jobs their whole lives, who paid social security. think about living on $889 a month in the city of san francisco needing to buy medication, one meal a day, hopefully, and health care. if we could provide health care early on we might prevent (inaudible) and people would be less likely to end up in the emergency room with a drastic outcome. we could actually provide prevention and health care to geg care,hoy f thout inrat ghbe re ceffecti